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Title: Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection In Vitro : Role Of Type-I Interferons And NF-kB In The Induction Of Classical And Nonclassical MHC-I Molecules
Authors: Abraham, Sojan
Advisors: Manjunath, R
Keywords: Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV)
RNA Viruses
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Virus Infection
Cell Adhesion Molecules
Flaviviruses
Interferons
Viruses
Virus Diseases - Immunological Aspects
Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection
Virus Induced Molecules
Nuclear Factor kB
JEV Infection
MHC-I
Submitted Date: Jan-2009
Series/Report no.: G23406
Abstract: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of the major causes of encephalitis in Asia. JEV causes serious inflammation of the brain, which may lead to permanent brain damage and has a high mortality rate. Almost 3 billion people live in JE endemic areas and JEV causes an estimated 20,000 cases of disease and 6000 deaths per year. JEV is a positive stranded RNA virus belonging to the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. The genome of JEV is about 11 kb long and codes for a polyprotein which is cleaved by both host and viral encoded proteases to form 3 structural and 7 non-structural proteins. JEV transmission occurs through a zoonotic cycle involving mosquitoes and vertebrate amplifying hosts, chiefly pigs and ardeid birds. Humans are infected when bitten by an infected mosquito and are dead end hosts. The role of humoral and cell mediated immune responses during JEV infection have been studied by several groups. While the humoral responses play a central role in protection against JEV, the cell mediated immune responses contributing to this end are not fully understood. The MHC molecules have been known to play predominant roles in host responses to viral infections and the consequences of virus infection on the expression of MHC molecules are varied. The expression of MHC-I molecules is known to decrease upon infection with many viruses such as HIV, MCMV, HCMV, Adv, and EBV. In contrast, infection with flavivirus such as West Nile Virus (WNV) has been shown to increase the cell surface expression of both MHC-I and MHC-II molecules. It has been reported previously that WNV infection increases the cell surface expression of adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1 as well as E-Selectin and these changes were mediated directly by WNV and not by soluble cytokines. In contrast to classical MHC-I molecules, the nonclassical MHC-I molecules do not belong to a single group of structurally and functionally homologous proteins and normally have lower cell surface expression. Earlier studies have shown that the expression of nonclassical MHC-I molecules were induced during infection with JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). However, the functional significance of this induction is unclear. Expression of nonclassical MHC-I molecules upon flaviviral infection is not very well understood. In this thesis, evidence is presented that JEV infection induces the expression of both classical and nonclassical MHC-I molecules on primary mouse brain astrocytes, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and H6 (hepatoma cell). The levels of adhesion molecules as well as molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation were also analyzed and our results clearly demonstrate that JEV infection induces their expression on astrocytes, MEFs and H6. The role of NF-κB and type-I IFNs in the induction of classical and nonclassical MHC-I molecules as well as molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation were also analyzed and our results demonstrated that type-I IFN mediated signaling is responsible for the induction of these molecules during JEV infection. Chapter 1 discusses the innate and adaptive immune system, the role of classical and nonclassical MHC molecules in the initiation of immune response and diverse strategies adapted by different viruses to evade the immune response. It also includes a detailed discussion about the IFN and NF-κB signaling pathways and their modulation by viral infection. Finally, the genome organization, epidemiology, transmission cycle, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical features, humoral as well as cell mediated immune response to JEV infection and the current vaccine status to JEV infection are briefly discussed. Chapter 2 describes the general materials and methods used in this study. It includes the details of the reagents and cell lines used in the experiments. It also discusses the various techniques such as RT-PCR, FACS analysis, EMSA and ELISA. Chapter 3 focusses on the validation of different knockout MEFs used in the study as well as confirming the purity of primary astrocyte cultures established from pub brains. The susceptibility of various cells to JEV infection has also been investigated. Our results confirmed the authenticity of all the cells and the purity of primary astrocyte cultures used in the study. Our results also indicated that all the cells used in the study are susceptible to JEV infection. Chapter 4 discusses the expression of MHC and related genes involved in immune response upon JEV infection of primary mouse brain astrocytes, MEFs and H6. Chapter 4 demonstrates for the first time that JEV infection induces the expression of nonclassical MHC-I or class Ib molecules namely Qa-1, Qb1 and T10 in addition to the induction of classical MHC-I molecules. In contrast to WNV, there was no increase in the cell surface expression of MHC-II molecules upon JEV infection of primary mouse brain astrocytes. JEV infection also induces the expression of adhesion molecules as well as molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation namely Tap1, Tap2, Tapasin, Lmp2, Lmp7 and Lmp10. Chapter 5 demonstrates that JEV infection induces NF-κB activation in astrocytes and MEFs. Studies using MEFs deficient in classical and alternate pathways of NF-κB activation indicate that JEV activates the classical pathway of NF-κB activation and is dependent on canonical lKKβ/IKK2 activity. JEV infection of astrocytes, MEFs and H6 induces the production of type-I IFNs. To determine the mechanism of type-I IFN induction during JEV infection, MEFs deficient in NF-κB signaling and IFN signaling were used. Results indicate that type-I IFN production in MEFs occurs by both NF-κB dependent and independent mechanisms. In contrast, the production of IFN-α was completely abrogated in IFNAR-\- MEFs whereas IFN-β production was greatly reduced. Production of type-I IFNs in IFNGR-\- MEFs is also reduced upon JEV infection but the reason for this is unclear. Chapter 6 demonstrates that JEV induced expression of classical MHC-I molecules occurs by type-I IFN mediated signaling. This result is in contrast to WNV infection, in which both NF-κB and type-I IFNs are involved in the induction of classical MHC-I molecules. Type-I IFNs were also shown to be involved in the induction of nonclassical MHC molecules namely, Qa-1 and Qb1 during JEV infection. In contrast, the expression of T10, another nonclassical MHC molecule occurs independent of type-I IFN signaling. The expression of molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation namely, Tap1, Tap2, Lmp2 and Lmp7 was type-I IFN-mediated, whereas the expression of Tapasin and Lmp10 was mediated by both type-I IFN dependent and independent mechanisms. The expression of VCAM-1 was dependent on NF-κB mediated signaling. Chapter 7 precisely describes the underlying mechanism of induction of MHC and various other related molecules and their significance during JEV infection. In addition, it also includes a working model for the induction of these molecules during JEV infection. In summary, this is the first study in which the mechanism of JEV mediated induction of classical as well as nonclassical MHC molecules has been studied in detail. This study clearly demonstrated that type-I IFNs are involved in the induction of classical and nonclassical MHC-I molecules during JEV infection. The functional significance of this JEV mediated induction of classical MHC-I molecules is unclear, but it has been proposed that this is to escape from the action of NK cells. The absence of MHC-II induction during JEV infection could be important because it may lead to the initiation of an immune response which is different from that induced during other viral infections which induce the expression of MHC-II molecules. In contrast to classical MHC-I molecules, the functional and biological significance of nonclassical MHC-I molecules are poorly studied. Nonclassical MHC-I molecules play an important role in bridging adaptive and innate immune response. So the nonclassical MHC molecules induced during JEV infection may play an important role in the initiation of immune response during JEV infection. The role these nonclassical MHC-I molecules in antigen presentation during JEV infection is not known. These nonclassical antigens are also recognized by NK and γδT cells, thus the expression of nonclassical MHC-I molecules during JEV infection might also confer a protective role.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2005/1087
Appears in Collections:Biochemistry (biochem)

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